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Gear to Get Off the Grid https://dqh5gwkalhnqo.cloudfront.net/magearray/news/image/cache/1900/gear-to-get-you-off-the-grid.jpg

Summer is local camping season, which can make it hard to get some peace and quiet close to home. So instead, head further afield and stay for longer with our list of equipment to help you stay self-sufficient while you camp.

  1. Dual battery system

Well-appointed campsites are usually the ones that campers flock to, which means you might need to stay at sites without facilities to get your slice of paradise. If you’re planning on going bush camping for extended periods of time, you need to be properly prepared – which is where a dual battery system comes in to play. An auxiliary battery, combined with a suitable power management solution, will allow you to keep your fridge cold, your camp lights running and power 240v appliances while you sit and enjoy the serenity.

  1. Camping fridge

When people say camping lets you ‘get away from it all’, they’re not just talking about nine-to-five jobs and bills in the mail. The quietest campsites are often a fair whack away from supply points like towns, which means it’s a good idea to take all your foods with you when you go camping. Camp fridges (combined with a power supply) come in a variety of sizes and have a freezer option too, which makes it easy to head into the unknown with the knowledge that your food and drinks will be cold for your entire trip.

  1. Water storage

The saying goes that you should have five litres of water per person per day when you go camping – a figure that piles up quickly if you head out with a car full of passengers for a week or more. Water storage can be as simple as some 20L plastic containers, or you can keep your cargo space by installing a heavy-duty underbody water tank. Either way, with enough water on board you can live the good life off the grid that little bit longer.

  1. Organised cargo

Those who have done some 4WD touring will know that the ‘anywhere’ll do’ approach to packing simply becomes too painful for anything more than a weekend away. To make accessing and finding gear simple – both on the road or at camp – accessories like a drawer system, storage cases, car seat organisers, a cargo barrier or a ute canopy will take the complication out of cargo storage and save you from endlessly packing and unpacking your 4x4 to find the sunscreen or the frying pan.

Summer is local camping season, which can make it hard to get some peace and quiet close to home. So instead, head further afield and stay for longer with our list of equipment to help you stay self-sufficient while you camp.

Gear to Get Off the Grid

Summer is local camping season, which can make it hard to get some peace and quiet close to home. So instead, head further afield and stay for longer with our list of equipment to help you stay self-sufficient while you camp.

  1. Dual battery system

Well-appointed campsites are usually the ones that campers flock to, which means you might need to stay at sites without facilities to get your slice of paradise. If you’re planning on going bush camping for extended periods of time, you need to be properly prepared – which is where a dual battery system comes in to play. An auxiliary battery, combined with a suitable power management solution, will allow you to keep your fridge cold, your camp lights running and power 240v appliances while you sit and enjoy the serenity.

  1. Camping fridge

When people say camping lets you ‘get away from it all’, they’re not just talking about nine-to-five jobs and bills in the mail. The quietest campsites are often a fair whack away from supply points like towns, which means it’s a good idea to take all your foods with you when you go camping. Camp fridges (combined with a power supply) come in a variety of sizes and have a freezer option too, which makes it easy to head into the unknown with the knowledge that your food and drinks will be cold for your entire trip.

  1. Water storage

The saying goes that you should have five litres of water per person per day when you go camping – a figure that piles up quickly if you head out with a car full of passengers for a week or more. Water storage can be as simple as some 20L plastic containers, or you can keep your cargo space by installing a heavy-duty underbody water tank. Either way, with enough water on board you can live the good life off the grid that little bit longer.

  1. Organised cargo

Those who have done some 4WD touring will know that the ‘anywhere’ll do’ approach to packing simply becomes too painful for anything more than a weekend away. To make accessing and finding gear simple – both on the road or at camp – accessories like a drawer system, storage cases, car seat organisers, a cargo barrier or a ute canopy will take the complication out of cargo storage and save you from endlessly packing and unpacking your 4x4 to find the sunscreen or the frying pan.

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