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Sean Scott: The Expert Explorer https://dqh5gwkalhnqo.cloudfront.net/magearray/news/image/cache/1900/tasmania-seanscott.jpg

Famed photographer Sean Scott has travelled to almost every corner of the country with a camera in hand. So, what are his favourite destinations in each of Australia’s most iconic landscapes?


Coastal: Coral Coast, WA

Coral Coast, WA

“The region where the desert meets the Indian Ocean – this place is hard to beat.”
The Coral Coast is rich in more ways than one: known inland for its red dirt, white beaches and instantly recognisable landforms, one of the most diverse and action-packed marine environments in the entire world sits off its coastline too. Visits to the perfectly-named Shell Beach, the otherworldly Pinnacles or the ancient gorge country in Kalbarri National Park are all uniquely unforgettable stops in the region.


Beach: Lucky Bay, WA

Lucky Bay, WA

“Anyone who visits Lucky Bay is going to get a taste of some of the world’s best scenery and wildlife, guaranteed.”
There’s perhaps nowhere more postcard-ready in Australia than Lucky Bay. Everything from its electrifyingly blue waters to its blinding white sand and hopping inhabitants seem to be cut from a storybook called Too Good To Be True, and yet it very much is. In fact, Lucky Bay is a pearl amongst a string of beachside jewels in the region around Esperance, which makes the way it stands out all the more impressive.


Desert: The Outback Way, WA NT & QLD

The Outback Way

“The centre of Australia is so full of amazing desert landscapes that it’s hard to pinpoint one that sticks in my memory most.”
Known as Australia’s biggest shortcut, the 2,800km Outback Way cuts through central Australia and across some of its most awe-inspiring desert landscapes. The journey through the Great Victoria Desert – with its red sands, grassy plains and salt lakes – is a particular highlight. In addition to pure desert scenery, travellers on the Outback Way get to enjoy iconic sights like Uluru, Kata Tjuta and Tjorita, while potential side-trips include the epic Gunbarrel Highway for those looking for more white-knuckle four-wheel driving.


Semi-arid: Winton, QLD

Winton, QLD

“The country around Winton, which is full of jump-ups and prone to stunning sunsets, is one of my favourite places to explore.”
In the Outback but not quite the desert, the area around Winton is full of history and spectacular scenery. The landscape is dotted with flat-topped mesas and Mitchell grass, all shades of red and orange and is home to the world’s oldest dinosaur stampede site – which showcases over 3,300 dinosaur footprints from almost 100 million years ago. The region is stark yet breathtaking, making it a perfect inspiration for anyone with a camera in hand.


Mountainous: Tasmania

Tasmania

“Simply put, Tasmania’s mountains are unlike anything else you’ll find on the mainland.”
Known more for its hiking than its four-wheel drive touring, Tasmania’s mountains are unforgettable nonetheless. Its climate and semi-European landscapes give Australia’s island state a unique quality, which is evidenced by iconic peaks like Cradle Mountain and Mount Ossa, which are an eyeful whether they’re snow-capped or covered in green. Combined with its iconic coastal tracks, charming towns and the touring routes that connect them, Tasmania and its mountain ranges are a completely different kind of adventure in the best way possible.


Tropical: Cooktown region, QLD

Cooktown, QLD

“As tropical as it gets. There’s so much to explore in the region that one trip is never enough.”
Nothing says tropical quite like Tropical North Queensland. Exploding with bright green life that’s perfectly in time with the swing of the seasons, the wilder areas around Cooktown distil the best parts of the region with real swagger. The palm-fringed coast has sparkling waters and bright sands, while inland the Daintree rainforest awaits with its dense canopy and denser undergrowth. A drive along the Bloomfield Track and up the clay-ridden CREB Track give four-wheel drivers a front-row seat to the area’s green heart, while beyond them is the iconic Old Telegraph Track.


Forest: Boranup Forest, WA

Boranup, WA

“This section of South West WA is truly unique. A drive through the karri forest is quite incredible and there are plenty of great images to take.”
South West Western Australia is famous for its beaches, but the Boranup Forest can make just as big an impression. In some ways, the contrast between these environs is what makes the forest all the more striking – one minute you’re enjoying the sun and open coastline and the next you’re driving along a lonely dirt track among thousands of tall timbers. The karri is actually one of the tallest hardwoods in the world (many grow over 50m tall), which is a fact that points to why the Boranup Forest is so memorable to visitors.


Famed photographer Sean Scott has travelled to almost every corner of the country with a camera in hand. So, what are his favourite destinations in each of Australia’s most iconic landscapes?

Sean Scott: The Expert Explorer

Famed photographer Sean Scott has travelled to almost every corner of the country with a camera in hand. So, what are his favourite destinations in each of Australia’s most iconic landscapes?


Coastal: Coral Coast, WA

Coral Coast, WA

“The region where the desert meets the Indian Ocean – this place is hard to beat.”
The Coral Coast is rich in more ways than one: known inland for its red dirt, white beaches and instantly recognisable landforms, one of the most diverse and action-packed marine environments in the entire world sits off its coastline too. Visits to the perfectly-named Shell Beach, the otherworldly Pinnacles or the ancient gorge country in Kalbarri National Park are all uniquely unforgettable stops in the region.


Beach: Lucky Bay, WA

Lucky Bay, WA

“Anyone who visits Lucky Bay is going to get a taste of some of the world’s best scenery and wildlife, guaranteed.”
There’s perhaps nowhere more postcard-ready in Australia than Lucky Bay. Everything from its electrifyingly blue waters to its blinding white sand and hopping inhabitants seem to be cut from a storybook called Too Good To Be True, and yet it very much is. In fact, Lucky Bay is a pearl amongst a string of beachside jewels in the region around Esperance, which makes the way it stands out all the more impressive.


Desert: The Outback Way, WA NT & QLD

The Outback Way

“The centre of Australia is so full of amazing desert landscapes that it’s hard to pinpoint one that sticks in my memory most.”
Known as Australia’s biggest shortcut, the 2,800km Outback Way cuts through central Australia and across some of its most awe-inspiring desert landscapes. The journey through the Great Victoria Desert – with its red sands, grassy plains and salt lakes – is a particular highlight. In addition to pure desert scenery, travellers on the Outback Way get to enjoy iconic sights like Uluru, Kata Tjuta and Tjorita, while potential side-trips include the epic Gunbarrel Highway for those looking for more white-knuckle four-wheel driving.


Semi-arid: Winton, QLD

Winton, QLD

“The country around Winton, which is full of jump-ups and prone to stunning sunsets, is one of my favourite places to explore.”
In the Outback but not quite the desert, the area around Winton is full of history and spectacular scenery. The landscape is dotted with flat-topped mesas and Mitchell grass, all shades of red and orange and is home to the world’s oldest dinosaur stampede site – which showcases over 3,300 dinosaur footprints from almost 100 million years ago. The region is stark yet breathtaking, making it a perfect inspiration for anyone with a camera in hand.


Mountainous: Tasmania

Tasmania

“Simply put, Tasmania’s mountains are unlike anything else you’ll find on the mainland.”
Known more for its hiking than its four-wheel drive touring, Tasmania’s mountains are unforgettable nonetheless. Its climate and semi-European landscapes give Australia’s island state a unique quality, which is evidenced by iconic peaks like Cradle Mountain and Mount Ossa, which are an eyeful whether they’re snow-capped or covered in green. Combined with its iconic coastal tracks, charming towns and the touring routes that connect them, Tasmania and its mountain ranges are a completely different kind of adventure in the best way possible.


Tropical: Cooktown region, QLD

Cooktown, QLD

“As tropical as it gets. There’s so much to explore in the region that one trip is never enough.”
Nothing says tropical quite like Tropical North Queensland. Exploding with bright green life that’s perfectly in time with the swing of the seasons, the wilder areas around Cooktown distil the best parts of the region with real swagger. The palm-fringed coast has sparkling waters and bright sands, while inland the Daintree rainforest awaits with its dense canopy and denser undergrowth. A drive along the Bloomfield Track and up the clay-ridden CREB Track give four-wheel drivers a front-row seat to the area’s green heart, while beyond them is the iconic Old Telegraph Track.


Forest: Boranup Forest, WA

Boranup, WA

“This section of South West WA is truly unique. A drive through the karri forest is quite incredible and there are plenty of great images to take.”
South West Western Australia is famous for its beaches, but the Boranup Forest can make just as big an impression. In some ways, the contrast between these environs is what makes the forest all the more striking – one minute you’re enjoying the sun and open coastline and the next you’re driving along a lonely dirt track among thousands of tall timbers. The karri is actually one of the tallest hardwoods in the world (many grow over 50m tall), which is a fact that points to why the Boranup Forest is so memorable to visitors.


Slava Yurthev Copyright