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7 Things You Should Never Do in a 4WD Recovery

7 Things You Should Never Do in a 4WD Recovery

Monday, February 18, 2019

7 Things You Should Never Do in a 4WD Recovery
 
Getting bogged is all part of the 4WDing experience and it’s vital that 4WD owners understand how to properly recover their vehicle if they get stuck. The two most effective ways of recovering a 4WD after getting bogged is by using a snatch strap or winch, and both have their advantages and drawbacks.
 
There’s no doubt that 4WD recoveries can be very dangerous! Pulling an object which weighs thousands of kilograms from being stuck in mud or sand requires a great deal of force, and there have been many tragedies over the years which could have been prevented. To give you some insight, today we’ll be sharing with you our top 7 things you should never do in a 4WD recovery.
 
Use your tow ball as a recovery point
While tow balls may appear to be strong, they’renowhere near strong enough to be used as a recovery point. Tow balls are designed for constant down-load pressure and not extreme side-load pressure and they will break to become a high-speed flying object if you try to recover from it. There have been numerous instances where a tow ball has seriously injured and even killed people simply because not enough people are aware of the dangers involved.
 
Stand too close to the recovery
One of the most dangerous things you can do in a recovery is stand too close to the action. While recovering a vehicle stuck in sand or mud may be exciting to watch, it’s also very dangerous as there are multiple things which can go wrong. Your strap or cable could break, your recovery point could fail, or your vehicle could gain too much momentum and launch at bystanders. It’s recommended that everyone stand at least 50m from the recovery and preferably in their vehicles.
 
Recover from points which are not rated
Very few 4WDs come with rated recovery points from factory and what may appear to be a recovery point is actually a tie down point for transporting the vehicle. If you try to recover from any of these points then you’ll likely see a chunk of metal flying through the air at high speeds. Always ensure that you use rated recovery points from at least two M12 grade 8.8 bolts which are attached safely to the chassis.
 
Forgetting to use a shovel before recovery
While shovelling sand or mud from under your 4WD may not be the most glamourous job, it substantially reduces the force needed to recover your vehicle. Most of the time, shovelling in front of all four wheels only takes about 10 minutes and this allows your 4WD to pop up onto the surface much easier. Plus, you’ll significantly reduce the chance of your snatch strap or cable breaking.
 
Join two snatch straps with a shackle
In some circumstances, the length of one snatch strap isn’t enough to recover your 4WD so using two snatch straps joined together is the logical option. If you need to do this, it’s vital that you connect the straps together with the right technique and not just join them together with a shackle which can fail and become a lethal projectile. Snatch straps should only be joined together by feeding the end of Strap A through the eye of Strap B, and then feeding the same eye of Strap A over the other end of Strap B.
 
Rush to recover
Unless you’re bogged in sand and the tide’s coming in or your 4WD is filling with water, there’s no need to rush a recovery. All this does is creates more stress and you won’t be able to think clearly about which type of recovery is the easiest, quickest, and safest. There are multiple ways you can recover in any given situation and you need to take the time to consider your options and setup your recovery carefully.
 
Overload your winch
While winches are a fantastic recovery tool, you need to take care not to overload them especially when you’re bogged in mud. Most 4WD owners will purchase a 12,000lb winch and this tends to be underrated if you’re stuck up to your chassis in mud. Always use snatch blocks if you have them and dig around your chassis and tyres to reduce the load on your winch.
 
The most important part of 4WDing is having fun and ensuring you return home safely. While getting bogged isn’t the most pleasant feeling, it’s much better to spend more time coming up with a safe and efficient way to recover than rushing your recovery and potentially injuring someone. Stay safe, and happy 4WDing!
 
For a range of 4WD products and accessories along with a variety of high-quality recovery gear, get in touch with TJM Australia by phoning our staff on 07 3865 9999. Alternatively, visit our store locator to find out which TJM store is closest to you.